Volume No. 5 Issue No.: 3A Page No.: 764-772 January-March 2011

 

ISOLATION, SCREENING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYHYDROXYALKANOATES PRODUCING BACTERIA UTILIZING EDIBLE OIL AS CARBON SOURCE

 

Darshan Marjadi*1 and Nishith Dharaiya2

1. Department of Biotechnology, Sheth M. N. Science College, Patan, Gujarat (INDIA)
2. Department of Life Sciences, HNG University, Patan, Gujarat (INDIA)

 

Received on : October 28, 2010

 

ABSTRACT

 

Environmental biotechnology has the intention of increasing sustainability of production processes by employing biological systems and thereby benefiting the environment. Microorganisms are a biological system which is generally used for the reduction of pollution from air, aquatic or terrestrial systems. Edible oil and fats are utilized by microorganisms and produces new product such as lipase and biodiesel was investigated. In present study the microorganisms utilizing edible oil as carbon source were isolated and investigation of their characteristics towards the production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), which is now a days well known as Biodegradable polymer. Sixteen bacterial colonies were isolated, screened by providing various edible oils as carbon source and preserved using glycerol. The microorganism then stained for PHA with Sudan Black B stain. We have found that nine out of sixteen strains exhibited PHA producing ability. The organisms were identified through several biochemical morphological, culture and physiological characteristics and showed affiliation to Bacillus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus. With the positive isolates, an attempt was made for the production and extraction of Biodegradable polymer. Finally, the biomass and extracted PHA content was determined where high level of production of PHA was observed under aerobic condition using sesame oil (4.5%) by Staphyococcus (DSM-IV), palm oil (3.7%) by Pseudomonas (DSM-V), Soya bin oil (2.7%) by Pseudomonas (DSM-IX.).

 

Keywords : Pollution, Plastic, Edible oil, Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), Biological system

 

 

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